Bryan Gore

Dec. 3, 1938 — Dec. 7, 2018

From Richland, WABorn in Downers Grove, IL

Celebration of Life

  •   Starts:
    Sat, January 5 2019, 3 p.m.
  •   Location:
    Einan's at Sunset
    915 Bypass Highway

    Richland, WA US 99352

Bryan F. Gore

Bryan F. Gore, age 80, died from a heart attack, while walking with his wife Barbara and their dog Haida, in his neighborhood in Richland, WA on Friday, December 7, 2018.  

Bryan was born in Downers Grove, IL, in 1938 to Greenville “Doc” and Mary (Bryan) Gore.  Greenville was head of the math department at Roosevelt University and Mary was an elementary school teacher.  Bryan was the sun and the moon to his parents.  Through his parents, Bryan developed his interest in nature, science and all types of music.  Bryan played clarinet in band and orchestra in high school and college, and was assistant drum major in the marching band at Cornell.  He received his BS/MS in physics at Cornell University in 1962, and was active in the Triangle engineering fraternity.  

Bry met his wife Barb during graduate studies at University of Michigan, where he earned a PhD in high energy particle physics in 1966 and Barb earned her Masters in Library Science.  Bry and Barb were married in 1963 in Dexter, MI, and Daughter Marcy was born in 1965.

Bry taught physics and astronomy and completed post-doctoral studies at Central Washington State University, University of Idaho, and University of Maryland.  Son Russell was born in Pullman, WA in 1968, and son David Gore was born in Cheverly, MD in 1969.  

In 1972, Bry moved with his family to Richland, WA and took a position at the WSU Graduate Center.  In 1973 he started working for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where he worked for the next 30 years.  Barb stayed home until the kids were older, and later worked as a reference librarian at many of the public libraries and CBC. 

Highlights of Bry’s career at PNNL included working at the Critical Mass Lab, licensing nuclear reactor operators, and working on the International Nuclear Safety Program.  He was active in the American Nuclear Society, serving as local chapter President for two years.  In 1995, Bry went to Slavutych, Ukraine for 2 years, to assist with risk analysis and safe closure of the Chornobyl nuclear site.  He was the first of the multinational team to live in Slavutych, and Barb joined him to live there for a year and a half. With his Russian language skills, friendly demeanor, beard, and leather jacket, he was accepted, and invited into the homes of his neighbors and local team members, and was occasionally mistaken for a local.

Barb and his three children were the center of Bry’s life.  Weekends were typically spent together, often in the outdoors hiking, jeeping, camping, and backpacking.  Winter weekends were filled with many skiing/snowboarding trips.  Dad and the boys rode and repaired dirt bikes together.  He and Barb supported their daughter in caring for, training, and showing her horse in 4-H.  Bry coached his boys’ football and baseball teams.  He taught himself to sail, bought a catamaran, and the family often went sailing on the river.  An old speed boat was acquired and the Ford 428 engine was rebuilt by father and sons.  The family spent many weekends waterskiing and riding skurfers, the precursors of wakeboards.  

Bry loved running, and was often joined by Barb.  By his late 30’s, he was running 6 miles after work most days, and entered many local fun runs.  Around this time, his kids started running with him.  He was always supportive, and has done countless runs and marathons with all of his kids.  He ran over 40 marathons, including the Boston Marathon and the Pan Am Games Marathon in Yakima.  

After a friend introduced him to mountaineering, he and his family climbed multiple volcanoes and 14,000+ ft peaks together.  Russ and Dave took SCUBA lessons in college, and encouraged their parents to certify.  The family enjoyed many diving trips.   Bry most loved sharing all of these outdoor activities with his wife, kids, and grandkids.

Bry always found the good in people, and accepted them for who they were. He was well liked by his students, coworkers, neighbors, running compatriots, and made friends everywhere he went.  Bry has friends around the world that call him ‘bro” and mean it.  He welcomed his kids’ friends into his home, took them boating and skiing, and made them part of the family.  When the kids and their friends got their own boats and cars, everyone asked if Bry and Barb wanted to go too.  

One of our favorite memories of Dad is how he loved to dance, especially with his beloved wife.  They were a team, and had a wonderful 55 year marriage together. He was always proud of his beautiful, athletic wife, who made her family her top priority.  

Before Bry retired, he pursued a life-long dream of flying aerobatics, which he had put on hold while he and Barb raised their family.  He got his pilot’s license at age 60, bought a 2-seat aerobatic airplane and taught himself loops, rolls, spins, hammer-heads, etc.  He did well in competitions around the Pacific Northwest, and moved up to compete in the Advanced level in his Pitts bi-wing.   He and Barb flew to the mountains for camping and hiking, and he took his kids and grandkids on trips to hike, fly aerobatics, and visit Mt Rainier.   

Bry was a wonderful, loving husband, father, son, uncle, grandfather, friend, and bro, who loved his family unconditionally.  He was preceded in passing by his parents Greenville and Mary, parents in law Erwin and Margaret, Brother-in-law Donald, and Bro-in-law John .  He is survived by: wife Barbara; children Marcy(Francis), Russ(Teresa), Dave(Maria); grand children Alexandria (Josh), Kelly (Jordan), Bryan, Rachael, Bradley, Alexander, and Isabella;  nephews Ruben and Alfonso (Amber); sisters and bro-in-law Mary, and Dorie (Brooks).

In lieu of flowers, please make donations to your favorite charity.  Bry supported a number of causes including SIGN,homeless/wounded Veterans, Native Americans, POPP and the Humane Society, Public Broadcasting, and National Public Radio.

A Celebration of Life is scheduled for January 5, 2019, at 3 pm.  Einan’s at Sunset, Richland, is in charge of arrangements.  Please bring stories and memories to share.


Guestbook for

Bryan Gore


  • Bryan was a best pal and shared many adventures in HS Band & Orchestra, and on summer & college Christmas breaks (him Cornell and me U of I). His great folks were always there for us and both our Dads commuted the Burlington RR to Chi-town work from Downers Grove. Lots of ice-skating at Glen Pond in Glen Ellyn . . .& the Ravinia concerts. Many common interests and late night confabs in those days about life . . . and the future. Only had one opportunity to much later visit him, Barb and family in Richland mid-80's. Did some later emails after the digital age hit. Miss him and his great common sense, humor, wisdom, talent and intelligence. Did a little FaceBook bit after Barb called. Take care, Lady. https://www.facebook.com/dick.albright.16 Adios, Bro. See ya again . . . soon. Maybe we can do some spiritual aerobatics and swap "Wings" stories' . . . !

    Dick Albright
    Jan. 12, 2019
    Maricopa & Frazier Park CA
  • It is truly sad news and I send my deep-felt condolences to Barbara and the rest of his large and loving family. I met Bryan around 1995 while I was proving translations services to the International Nuclear Safety Program in Ukraine. Bryan’s joie de vivre was infectious and I remember this joyful spirit of Bryan at many meetings and dinners that we shared. He also had thirst for knowledge and desire to connect with local people and constantly asked for new Russian and Ukrainian so that he could build human bridges with the local people. It is also hard to forget the signature style elements of Bryan - his beard and his aviator leather jacket.

    Nicholas Lugansky
    Jan. 9, 2019
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • A few years later I came to work in Richland, WA for PNNL. Bryan was the one who welcomed me with offers to help with meeting people, finding fun activities like ultimate frisbee, and hosted me to a few dinners at his house, where I had a chance to meet his wonderful wife. As I moved to ANL and later to Bechtel, we kept running into each other and sharing our life experiences and he always cheered to my successes. I will always remember him as a person full of enthusiasm for life and passionate about everything he did.

    Nicholas Lugansky
    Jan. 9, 2019
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • (continued) I remember on one of our trips, Bryan was stopped at the entrance of the Marriott Grand because he looked like a local. He was bundled up against the cold, and with his old coat and hat, he must have looked out of place to the security guys at the front door. I believe he had to show them his hotel key card before they would let him pass. On another trip, Bryan's luggage never made it to Moscow with him. Since he hadn't brought along a carry-on bag with a change of clothes, he had to wash the same clothes every evening to wear to our meetings the next day. He found out later that his bag turned up in Italy. I will always have fond memories of my time working with Bry. Of all the projects I have supported over the years, his was the best, and I believe it was he who made it so. May he rest in peace.

    Eric Baumann
    Jan. 5, 2019
    Richland, WA
  • I'm very sad to hear of Bryan's passing. I worked with Bryan as soon as I was hired at PNNL over 16 years ago. I was his contracts specialist for his work on the US/Russia Plutonium Disposition Project from 2002 - 2006. He and I, along with fellow travelers from ORNL and DOE, would travel to Moscow several times a year for contract discussions. Bryan would get out and jog around the Kremlin in the morning. He never seemed to run out of energy.

    Eric Baumann
    Jan. 5, 2019
    Richland, WA
  • Bryan....thank you so much for including us in your lives...many wine crawls and letting us crash at your house....you will be missed by all....may you rest in peace....and enjoy the ones who passed bring you much love...we love you❤

    Duane and Lisa Erickson
    Jan. 5, 2019
    Auburn WA
  • Mnye ochin nravistya Brian Gore!! po tebe budut skuchat, po mnogim!! Proshchay moy drug, Do Svidaniya I liked Bryan Gore very much! You will be missed by many! Goodbye my friend. Until then.

    Bob Talbert
    Jan. 3, 2019
    kennewick
  • I worked with Bryan in the International Nuclear Safety Program at PNNL many years ago. It was obvious how much he loved Ukraine, Slavutych, and their people. He always had some joyful tale of his latest Ukrainian adventure. I seem to remember one involving homemade vodka?? :) What a great life he lived.

    Andrea McMakin
    Jan. 2, 2019
    Richland
  • My thoughts and prayers are with your family at this time. I worked with Bryan during his INSP days and remember him always with a ready smile or interesting story.

    Jan Reilly
    Jan. 2, 2019
    Richland
  • I knew Bryan as a fellow runner and fellow Cornellian. Always enjoyed talking at runs and races. Although sad to learn about his heart attack, it is also satisfying to learn more about someone who lived a rich full life.

    Don Baer
    Jan. 2, 2019
    PNNL
  • [continued, 4 of 4 final] Shortly after Bryan moved to Slavutich, we held a social gathering in Kyiv that involved US and Ukrainian government officials. When Yury Kostenko, then the Minister of the Environment for Ukraine, arrived, he immediately insisted that he meet Bryan, the American who was willing to move to Slavutich. This represented a real and deserved tribute to Bryan although some of the US officials my have felt a little slighted. I have always admired and had a very high regard for Bryan. His attitude and approach to life and career is an example for anyone seeking a rewarding life.

    Laurin Dodd
    Jan. 1, 2019
    S/V Second Wind, Pacific Ocean, Mexico
  • [continued, 3 of 4] Bryan was the first westerner to live in Slavytich, Ukraine, the company town for Chernobyl. He went there to help establish ways that we could work with Slavutich and Chernobyl in areas of nuclear and industrial safety at the operating reactors and in Unit 4. He also helped to establish an international laboratory and community exchanges. He immediately fit into this very foreign environment and was accepted and liked by the community and his coworkers

    Laurin Dodd
    Jan. 1, 2019
    S/V Second Wind, Pacific Ocean, Mexico
  • [continued, 2] He pursued opportunities that would both challenge and educate him. Nothing was too difficult for him, nor was was he ever ‘too good’ to pursue areas inconsistent with his educational level. His play life was as his professional life. Bryan was a runner and a skier and in his 60’s took up snow boarding and stunt flying. I have heard the stories of how he would see a mountain while driving his family somewhere and immediately decide to stop and climb it. I have seen him climb into the engine of an old jet boat that he bought for a song in order to coax it into running one more time.

    Laurin Dodd
    Jan. 1, 2019
    S/V Second Wind, Pacific Ocean, Mexico
  • The last time I saw Bryan was at Café Margarita in Moscow. It was either late 2005 or early 2006. We enjoyed some good food and music and caught up on each others lives. He was working with the Russian nuclear regulator to develop a regulatory framework for using mixed oxide (plutonium and uranium) fuels in their light water reactors. I was living there, managing some projects for Bechtel. I first met Bryan in 1980 when I went to work for PNNL. Bryan’s work and play activities during the intervening 25 years were uncommonly diverse. They are indicative of a life lived that sought new challenges, experiences, and knowledge. From teacher to experimental physicist (critical mass laboratory), to certified nuclear power plant license examiner (NRC), to advisor (Chernobyl) to regulatory developer, Bryan did it all.

    Laurin Dodd
    Jan. 1, 2019
    S/V Second Wind, Pacific Ocean, Mexico
  • I had the good fortune of knowing Bryan for more than forty years. I first got to know him while we both worked at the Battelle Critical Mass Laboratory in the early nineteen seventies. As many of you know, Bryan was an avid sportsman and was very good at most things he pursued. He and a mutual friend, Bill Converse introduced me to jogging at lunchtime. What I remember about Bryan is that though he could easily run circles around me, he and Bill would always stay "back" with me to keep me company and to promote my own running skill. I never forgot that small act of kindness. Years later, both Bryan and I worked in Ukraine at Chornobyl. Here again, Bryan led the way, being one of the very first on site. He was one of the best ambassadors that any project or country could possibly have had. The people naturally were attracted to him and loved him in Ukraine.

    The Durst Family
    Dec. 28, 2018
  • (Continue) Years later, when I joined him at Chornobyl, he made sure that I felt welcomed, as he invited me to several shashlik in the woods and introduced me to several of his Ukrainian friends. In all of these instances, I never saw him once try to promote himself or put himself forward as the most important person there. For Bryan, it was far more important to promote friendship and lasting bonds than any tangible personal benefit otherwise. As a result, I think that Bryan contributed greatly to the project that ultimately led to the construction of the largest moveable building in the history of mankind, built at Chornobyl to cover the destroyed Ukrainian reactor. But, what I think I will miss the most about him is his gentle and friendly side. His laugh was contagious and he was the first person to conjure up a nickname for me that lasts to this very day -"bum d" as he would say it (a caricature of my initials BMD).

    The Durst Family
    Dec. 28, 2018
  • (Continue) I can still hear him playfully asking me a tough technical question and than ending the question or beginning it with the nickname "bum d"? He was a remarkable man and his life was indeed a remarkable life. Whether on this side of the veil that separates this life from the next, I am confident that he will always remain my friend.

    The Durst Family
    Dec. 28, 2018
  • Dear Barbara and Family - I was deeply saddened to learn last week of Bryan's passing. It was a great professional and personal privilege of mine to have had the chance to work with Bryan from 2000-2006 on the U.S./Russia Plutonium Disposition Program. The trips we made to Russia created a lifetime of memories for me. Also, my last visit to PNNL in 2007 provided an opportunity for me to fly with Bryan in his airplane and experience the thrills (and chills) of stunt flying. However, I know from talking with Bryan that his greatest joy in life was his family. All of you will continue to remain in my thoughts and prayers. May His peace - the peace beyond our comprehension - be made available to you at this difficult time.

    Don Williams
    Dec. 26, 2018
    Vonore Tennessee
  • Sorry for your loss. As former neighbor and mother of similarly aged children, I enjoyed knowing Bryan. Kind and friendly man. My condolences to the family. Fond memories....

    Judy May
    Dec. 24, 2018
    Richland
  • My thoughts and prayers are with the entire family. So very sorry for the loss of such a wonderful man. God Bless! "lpc'...

    Linda Fastabend
    Dec. 19, 2018
    Richland
  • We are so sorry to lose such a wonderful man.

    Steve and Bonnie Baker
    Dec. 19, 2018
    Richland
  • I am so sorry to hear of your loss. Prayers for you and your family.

    Dawn Boggs Hamilton
    Dec. 16, 2018
    Walla Walla
  • I knew Bry and Barb only for one year in Ellensburg, WA and they were such a warmly welcoming family back then too. We’ve kept sporadically in touch and I’ve always been amazed at the physical energy they all have! Must be all that good food! My condolences to you all as you say goodbye to Bry’s physical presence in your lives.

    Suzanne Latham
    Dec. 16, 2018
    Phoenix, AZ
  • I am so sorry for your loss. Find peace and comfort in your many warm, wonderful, and amazing memories. He'll continue to be with you all always. Much Love.

    Irene Snell
    Dec. 16, 2018
    Portland, OR
  • I'm am so sorry for you loss. You will see him again. PEACE

    Karen A. Recher
    Dec. 16, 2018
    Kennewick WA

Sunset Gardens

A place for celebrating the memories of your loved one for years to come.

Einan's At Sunset

At Einan's, we want to help you to create a meaningful experience.

Cemetery At Sunset

Providing a place of solace for families to come for generations.

Events At Sunset

Our beautiful facility can accommodate groups from 10 to 250.

Find Us

915 Bypass Highway
Richland, Washington 99352

info@einansatsunset.com
(509) 943-1114 Phone
(509) 946-5678 Fax

 

© 2017 Sunset Gardens